Many candy lovers (at least this one) aren’t aware that chomping into a Milky Way bar may make one complicit in child-labor law violations and deforestation. The commodities that go into candy and gum—cocoa, mint and palm oil—are produced by some of the most impoverished people in the world, living in some of the world’s most environmentally vulnerable areas. Grant Reid, the CEO of Mars—the 109-year-old, $40 billion privately held pet-care, candy and food behemoth—has embarked on a multiyear effort to make the global food-supply chain more equitable and sustainable. He’s working with NGOs, governments and suppliers around the world to achieve that goal. As a private company with the third, fourth and fifth generations of the founders involved (they are referred to as G3, G4 and G5), Mars is better able to tackle complex, long-term problems than public corporations, which are subject to the brutal fun-house ritual known as quarterly earnings calls with Wall Street analysts.

Reid recently joined TIME for a video conversation about Mars’ diverse portfolio. The company’s pet-food and pet-care business, featuring brands like Pedigree (dog food) and Whiskas (cat food), is performing strongly in the pandemic as furry companions have become as popular as toilet paper; the pet business is now bigger than candy or food sales. He also discussed Mars’ ambitions, including the company’s belief that “everyone working within our extended supply chains should earn sufficient income to maintain a decent standard of living,” and its plan to reduce its carbon footprint by 67% by 2050.

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SOURCEhttps://time.com/

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